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Book Review #33: The 100 by Kass Morgan

the 100 book cover

“No one has set foot on Earth in centuries–until now.

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents–considered expendable by society–are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.

Clarke was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. Wells, the chancellor’s son came to Earth for the girl he loves–but will she ever forgive him? Reckless Bellamy fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And Glass managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.

Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.

After watching the first season and a bit of the second season of The 100 on Netflix, I decided to read the book that inspired the fan-favourite series. You know how they usually say that the book is better than the adaptation? Well, that’s not the case, especially for The 100. There were definitely interesting moments in the novel that I’m sad to say weren’t translated into the show, but overall the novel was sub-par.

The only interesting and engaging character seems to be Bellamy, as Clarke, Glass, and Wells seem tied up in love triangles of their own (and sometimes with each other, in Clarke and Wells’ case). The story ultimately tells you what happens instead of showing you what happens. It leaves much to the imagination, in this case, is that being the bad thing, and leaves us with characters we can’t empathize with.

When you have Sci-Fi or dystopian-like stories like this, you need to be grounded with your characters, settings and plot points. I honestly couldn’t care less about any of the characters.

In short, I’d say pass on the book and just binge-watch the show.

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My Rating

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Book Review #29: Orange Is The New Black by Piper Kerman

With a career, a boyfriend, and a loving family, Piper Kerman barely resembles the reckless young woman who delivered a suitcase of drug money ten years before. But that past has caught up with her. Convicted and sentenced to fifteen months at the infamous federal correctional facility in Danbury, Connecticut, the well-heeled Smith College alumna is now inmate number #11187-424–one of the millions of people who disappear “down the rabbit hole” of the American penal system. From her first strip search to her final release, Kerman learns to navigate this strange world with its strictly enforced codes of behavior and arbitrary rules. She meets women from all walks of life who surprise her with small tokens of generosity, hard words of wisdom, and simple acts of acceptance. Heartbreaking, hilarious, and at times enraging, Kerman’s story offers a rare look into the lives of women in prison–why it is we lock so many away and what happens to them when they’re there.

This novel is only the second adult memoir I have ever read and it gives a bit of improvement from the last one which you can read the review I gave for it here.

I found this novel really inviting and Kerman really relatable. At times this novel was a bit stale, as nothing much really happens, however, I found her daily life in prison fascinating. The friendships she made in this novel were very dear to her and as a reader, I could tell this wasn’t going to a be a novel about the oddities and atrocities of prison in America. This novel was about women and their relationships.

Now, I don’t mean to say I want to go commit a crime and jump into prison just to have close and sincere relationships with women of all ages, however, it seems like a good way to do it. Just kidding… but I wish I could be close with someone like that.

I would recommend this book to anyone who has seen the series and recognizes the fact that it is also about women and their relationships. I can also recommend this novel to anyone who wants to pick up a non-fiction novel and gain something from it.

Now, with this novel being adapted into a series I can’t help as a reader to look at differences between the novel and acclaimed Netflix Original Series (That people should watch! Because it’s awesomely good and I mean…Laverne Cox. ‘Nuff said). Some of the more recognizable characters in the series like Red, Sofia, and Pennastucky were actually characters from the novel. Events obviously, were not all the same, but I was surprised the peeing incident was in the book.

In conclusion, watch the show, read the novel. ‘Tis good. No matter which way you swing. (Could that be a reference to Kerman’s stint as a lesbian? We just don’t know.)

My Rating

My Rating

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