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Book Review #34: Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn

“When nearly killing a classmate gets seventeen-year-old Sadie Su kicked out of her third boarding school in four years, she returns to her family’s California vineyard estate. Here, she’s meant to stay out of trouble. Here, she’s meant to do a lot of things. But it’s hard. She’s bored. And when Sadie’s bored, the only thing she likes is trouble.

Emerson Tate’s a poor boy living a rich town with a widowed mother and strange, haunted little brother. All he wants his senior year is to play basketball and make something happen with the girl of his dreams. That’s why Emerson’s not happy Sadie’s back. An old childhood friend, she know his worst secrets. The thing he longs to forget. The things she won’t ever let him.

Haunted is a good word for fifteen-year-old Miles Tate. Miles can see the future, after all. And he knows his vision of tragic violence at his school will come true, because his visions always do. That’s what he tells the new girl in town. The one who listens to him. The one who recognizes the darkness in his past.

But can Miles stop the violence? Or has the future already been written? Maybe tragedy is his destiny. Maybe it’s all of theirs.”

Delicate Monsters is a book every teen should read. Raw and gritty, this tome packs a huge punch for its tiny size. Sadie, Emerson, and Miles are all unique in their own flawed way and make this story what it is. You don’t necessarily feel sorry for some of them, but you don’t feel triumphant at their pitfalls either. Every twist and turn you are more invested in this story. 

There isn’t really much more to say; this novel is great in its own right and you should stop reading this and go read this book.

Star_Rating_four and a half stars

My Rating

 

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Book Review #33: The 100 by Kass Morgan

the 100 book cover

“No one has set foot on Earth in centuries–until now.

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents–considered expendable by society–are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.

Clarke was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. Wells, the chancellor’s son came to Earth for the girl he loves–but will she ever forgive him? Reckless Bellamy fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And Glass managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.

Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.

After watching the first season and a bit of the second season of The 100 on Netflix, I decided to read the book that inspired the fan-favourite series. You know how they usually say that the book is better than the adaptation? Well, that’s not the case, especially for The 100. There were definitely interesting moments in the novel that I’m sad to say weren’t translated into the show, but overall the novel was sub-par.

The only interesting and engaging character seems to be Bellamy, as Clarke, Glass, and Wells seem tied up in love triangles of their own (and sometimes with each other, in Clarke and Wells’ case). The story ultimately tells you what happens instead of showing you what happens. It leaves much to the imagination, in this case, is that being the bad thing, and leaves us with characters we can’t empathize with.

When you have Sci-Fi or dystopian-like stories like this, you need to be grounded with your characters, settings and plot points. I honestly couldn’t care less about any of the characters.

In short, I’d say pass on the book and just binge-watch the show.

Star_Rating_Template_three

My Rating

Book Review #32: You’re Never Weird On the Internet (almost) by Felicia Day

Felicia Day is someone I admire for a few reasons; she’s overcome similar things that I have, and she’s a HUGE nerd/geek, like me. She also has a philosophy that I love, which includes lots of positivity statements. In her memoir, she shares a lot about her life, including deeply personal things, and it shows she has a lot of gusto.

She first describes her early days in school, then after a while being home-schooled for the rest of her schooling career. The tone of this book is definitely humorous, as the book is spattered with pictures such as a school photo of her younger self with a upside-down salad bowl photoshopped on her head. Felicia later describes her first gaming love, a online video game series called Ultima. Ultimately (pun definitely intended), Felicia’s game lead her to getting her first kiss with a boy she met through the game.

Amazingly, without graduating high school, Felicia made it to the University of Texas where she studied music and math, excelling in both. She had played violin since she was very young and had always loved math (not only because her grandfather urged her to pursue it due to his profession). After university she goes to L.A. to try to become an actress. Of course, in classic Felicia fashion, many funny hijinks ensue.

She eventually creates a web-series called The Guild based on the massively multiplayer online video game, World of Warcraft, which she may or may not have devoted her life to at one point. The series soon became a success, and she got roles in such media like Dr. Horrible’s Sing-A-LongBlog and Supernatural. In 2011, Felicia created a YouTube channel called “Geek & Sundry” where she posted many various videos favoring all of “geekdom.’

During this process, things were not always sunshine in Felicia’s life. She had trouble with anxiety, depression, and disease, making a portion of her life very difficult. Her experiences with these struggles reminded me of my own struggles, and I think I connected with her more as I was reading. I even teared up a bit while reading.

Felicia Day has a way of pulling you in. Her novel is not something you can put down very easily, and I devoured it in less than two days. You’re Never Weird On The Internet (almost) has a fun, spunky atmosphere that shows amazing talent. You go, Felicia.

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