Book Review #36: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, Jim Kay

9780763660659_p0_v1_s1200x630 The monster showed up after midnight.

As they do. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting, the one from the nightmare he’s had every night since his mother started her treatments, the one with the darkness and the wind and the screaming…

This monster is something different, something ancient, something wild. And it wants the truth.

 

 

Man. This book was amazing. My first completed book from Patrick Ness and I’m surprised I have not read it sooner than I did. I swear there were tears in my eyes as I read the ending. Definitely a must read for middle-readers and up.

In A Monster Calls, Conor’s mother has cancer. It’s a reality for many people. This book showed the reality of cancer and the toll it takes, not just on the person who has this horrible disease, but the family and friends surrounding them. Ness truly put a focus on that grief and that gut-wrenching feeling of not being able to do anything, but to be there for your family and friends.

The illustrations by Jim Kay were haunting, yet very beautiful and they complimented the story immensely. The style of the book reminded me greatly of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which is another book with paired illustrations and written content. Both books also pack a huge emotional punch. Everything about this book made me say “Yes, this will tear me apart and I love it!”

Ness truly brought Siobhan Dowd’s final idea to life, and honored her in writing A Monster Calls. The lessons and truths put in this story are truly a measure of awesomeness by two amazing writers. The book was so sad, yet filled with meaning.

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My Rating

 

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Book Review #35: The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer

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Image via Simon and Shuster

 Matteo Alacran was not born ; he was harvested. His DNA came from El Patron, lord of a country called Opium–a strip of poppy fields lying between the United States and what was once called Mexico. Matt’s first cell split and divided inside a petri dish. Then he was placed in the womb of a cow, where he continued the miraculous from embryo to fetus to baby. He is a boy now, but most consider him a monster–except for El Patron. El Patron loves Matt as he loves himself, because Matt is himself.

As Matt struggles to understand his existence, he is threatened by sinister cast of characters, including El Patron’s power-hungry family, and he is surrounded by a dangerous army of bodyguards. Escape is the only chance Matt has to survive. But escape from the Alacran Estate is no guarantee of freedom, because Matt is marked by his difference in ways he doesn’t even expect.

This book reminded me (although I have not read it in full) a bit of The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness. It is similar in many ways, although this novel was vastly different.

My initial thought when I picked up this book was that it was Dystopian. I was definitely right about that. When you first open the book, you are taken a bit slightly off-guard at the table of contents, which revealed that you were going to be reading the entire childhood of this boy. Next is a list of characters, and an Alacaran family history. In my opinion, those additions to the book didn’t really seem necessary as I could easily follow what was going on, and who the characters were.

Honestly, I really liked this book. Matt is a character that you fall in love with; he is genuinely a good person, thrust into some awful situations. You are watching this boy grow up, and it is really entertaining. I’m not going to reveal too much of what happens in this book, to keep this review spoiler-free. I will say that the twists and turns this book had were very well done, you could hardly expect them coming. The setting and secondary characters in this novel are very well developed. Nothing seemed sort of “out there” as some dystopian books have done in the past. My only gripes with this novel are that some of the excitement and tenseness dropped off about two thirds into the tome, which wasn’t by much, however it is still noticeable.

The idea of Matt as a clone, and how he was treated because of it made him into the character he is by the end of the novel. Clones were treated as less than human; as monsters. As Matt grappled with this concept, you could see his inner most confusion with the idea of what it means to be human and to have a soul.

The House of the Scorpion is a must-read for anyone who enjoys the literary struggle of the concept of humanity.

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My Rating

Book Review #34: Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn

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Image via GoodReads

“When nearly killing a classmate gets seventeen-year-old Sadie Su kicked out of her third boarding school in four years, she returns to her family’s California vineyard estate. Here, she’s meant to stay out of trouble. Here, she’s meant to do a lot of things. But it’s hard. She’s bored. And when Sadie’s bored, the only thing she likes is trouble.

Emerson Tate’s a poor boy living a rich town with a widowed mother and strange, haunted little brother. All he wants his senior year is to play basketball and make something happen with the girl of his dreams. That’s why Emerson’s not happy Sadie’s back. An old childhood friend, she know his worst secrets. The thing he longs to forget. The things she won’t ever let him.

Haunted is a good word for fifteen-year-old Miles Tate. Miles can see the future, after all. And he knows his vision of tragic violence at his school will come true, because his visions always do. That’s what he tells the new girl in town. The one who listens to him. The one who recognizes the darkness in his past.

But can Miles stop the violence? Or has the future already been written? Maybe tragedy is his destiny. Maybe it’s all of theirs.”

Delicate Monsters is a book every teen should read. Raw and gritty, this tome packs a huge punch for its tiny size. Sadie, Emerson, and Miles are all unique in their own flawed way and make this story what it is. You don’t necessarily feel sorry for some of them, but you don’t feel triumphant at their pitfalls either. Every twist and turn you are more invested in this story. 

There isn’t really much more to say; this novel is great in it’s own right and you should stop reading this and go read this book.

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My Rating

 

Book Review #33: The 100 by Kass Morgan

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Image via hachettebookgroup.com

“No one has set foot on Earth in centuries–until now.

Ever since a devastating nuclear war, humanity has lived on spaceships far above Earth’s radioactive surface. Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents–considered expendable by society–are being sent on a dangerous mission: to recolonize the planet. It could be their second chance at life…or it could be a suicide mission.

Clarke was arrested for treason, though she’s haunted by the memory of what she really did. Wells, the chancellor’s son came to Earth for the girl he loves–but will she ever forgive him? Reckless Bellamy fought his way onto the transport pod to protect his sister, the other half of the only pair of siblings in the universe. And Glass managed to escape back onto the ship, only to find that life there is just as dangerous as she feared it would be on Earth.

Confronted with a savage land and haunted by secrets from their pasts, the hundred must fight to survive. They were never meant to be heroes, but they may be mankind’s last hope.”

After watching the first season and a bit of the second season of The 100 on Netflix, I decided to read the book that inspired the fan-favourite series. You know how they usually say that the book is better than the adaptation? Well, that’s not the case, especially for The 100. There were definitely interesting moments in the novel that I’m said to say weren’t translated into the show, but overall the novel was sub-par.

The only interesting and engaging character seems to be Bellamy, as Clarke, Glass, and Wells seem tied up in love triangles of their own (and sometimes with each other, in Clarke and Wells’ case). The story ultimately tells you what happens instead of showing you what happens. It leaves much to the imagination, in this case being that being the bad thing, and leaves us with characters we can’t empathize with.

When you have Sci-Fi or dystopian-like stories like this, you need to be grounded with your characters, settings and plot points. I honestly couldn’t care less about any of the characters.

In short, I’d say pass on the book and just binge watch the show.

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My Rating

Book Review #31: The Farm by Emily McKay

Image via Good Reads

 “Life was different in the Before: Before vampires began devouring humans in a swarm across North America, before the surviving young people were rounded up and quarantined. These days we know what quarantines are–holding pens where human blood is turned into more food for undead monsters, known as Ticks. Surrounded by electrical fences, most kids try to survive the Farms by turning on each other…And when trust is a thing of the past, escape is nearly impossible.Lily and her twin sister, Mel, have a plan. Though Mel can barely communicate, her autism helps her notice things no one else does–like the portion of electrical fence that gets turned off every night. Getting across won’t be easy, but as Lily gathers what they need to escape, a familiar face appears out of nowhere, offering to help…Carter was a schoolmate of Lily’s in the Before. Managing to evade capture until now, he has valuable knowledge of the outside world. But like everyone on the Farm, Carter has his own agenda, and he knows that behind the Ticks is an even more dangerous threat to the human race…”

There seemed to be an overarching dullness to this novel that I only found was breached by a few moments in the novel. When Carter was first introduced, I thought, “Yeah! This novel might be going somewhere with him and his secrets and ladeeda!” However, it definitely went somewhere. Just nowhere necessarily exciting. Sure, there were some parts where I was glued to my book, waiting to see what happened next, but overall it was kind of dull for me. I mean, maybe it wasn’t descriptive enough in describing the Ticks or maybe I didn’t feel scared enough for the characters. I’m not sure. Maybe it was because that in an almost 450 page novel, not all too much happens. The ending however, was interesting, not sure where the author is going to go with that in the second novel. On the plus side I didn’t find the main character annoying. So it wasn’t THAT agonizing to read. It was just okay is all. If you’re looking for a new take on vampires, this might be the book for you. Otherwise, this may not be your cup of tea. I guess I’ll read the next book and see what happens.

My Rating
My Rating