Book Review #31: The Farm by Emily McKay

Life was different in the Before: Before vampires began devouring humans in a swarm across North America, before the surviving young people were rounded up and quarantined. These days we know what quarantines are–holding pens where human blood is turned into more food for undead monsters, known as Ticks. Surrounded by electrical fences, most kids try to survive the Farms by turning on each other…And when trust is a thing of the past, escape is nearly impossible.Lily and her twin sister, Mel, have a plan. Though Mel can barely communicate, her autism helps her notice things no one else does–like the portion of electrical fence that gets turned off every night. Getting across won’t be easy, but as Lily gathers what they need to escape, a familiar face appears out of nowhere, offering to help…Carter was a schoolmate of Lily’s in the Before. Managing to evade capture until now, he has valuable knowledge of the outside world. But like everyone on the Farm, Carter has his own agenda, and he knows that behind the Ticks is an even more dangerous threat to the human race…”

There seemed to be an overarching dullness to this novel that I only found was breached by a few moments in the novel. When Carter was first introduced, I thought, “Yeah! This novel might be going somewhere with him and his secrets and ladeeda!” However, it definitely went somewhere. Just nowhere necessarily exciting. Sure, there were some parts where I was glued to my book, waiting to see what happened next, but overall it was kind of dull for me. I mean, maybe it wasn’t descriptive enough in describing the Ticks or maybe I didn’t feel scared enough for the characters. I’m not sure. Maybe it was because that in an almost 450 page novel, not all too much happens. The ending however, was interesting, not sure where the author is going to go with that in the second novel. On the plus side I didn’t find the main character annoying. So it wasn’t THAT agonizing to read. It was just okay is all. If you’re looking for a new take on vampires, this might be the book for you. Otherwise, this may not be your cup of tea. I guess I’ll read the next book and see what happens.

My Rating
My Rating
Advertisements

Book Review #30: Rotters by Daniel Kraus

Grave-robbing. What kind of monster would do such a thing? It’s true that Leonardo da Vinci did it, Shakespeare wrote about it, and the resurrection men of nineteenth-century Scotland practically made it an art. But none of this matters to Joey Crouch, a sixteen-year-old straight-A student living in Chicago with his single mom. For the most part, Joey’s life is about playing the trumpet and avoiding the daily humiliations of high school.

Everything changes when Joey’s mother dies in a tragic accident and he is sent to rural Iowa to live with the father he has never known, a strange, solitary man with unimaginable secrets. At first, Joey’s father wants nothing to do with him, but once father and son come to terms with each other, Joey’s life takes a turn both macabre and exhilarating.

Daniel Kraus’s masterful plotting and unforgettable characters make Rotters a moving, terrifying, and unconventional epic about fathers and sons, complex family ties, taboos, and the ever-present specter of mortality.”

If you are a horror buff or you like good writing and don’t mind the horror aspect of this novel then you need to read it. What can I say more? This novel was probably one of the best books I have read. It wasn’t perfect, but it was perfect in the way the story went and played out.

Joey was completely relatable and his personality changes quite a bit in the novel (for better and for worse), but you still consider him to be a likeable character.

Everything was described so gorgeously–especially the horrific bits–and I wanted to eat it all up, (call me Hannibal Lecter).

What I really liked was the things that happened to Joey. Things just got worse and bleaker for him as the novel went on and I loved it. Call me a sadistic bastard all you want, but I found this to be one of the great factors of the novel. Kraus, like many authors, likes to put their characters through hell.

Overall, this novel was great and I would like to see more from Daniel Kraus.

My Rating
My Rating

Book Review #28: Carrie by Stephen King

The story of misfit high-school girl, Carrie White, who gradually discovers that she has telekinetic powers. Repressed by a domineering, ultra-religious mother and tormented by her peers at school, her efforts to fit in lead to a dramatic confrontation during the senior prom.”

I have never read a Stephen King novel prior to this one, but I’m glad I did read one of his novels because this was great! It wasn’t outlined in chapters like other novels, however, it was separated with things such as book excerpts, articles, and court testimonies. That fact of the book made it really raw and gritty like I was reading something written about an actual event.

However, as much as I did love this book there were quite a few things that really rubbed me the wrong way. First of all, all the foreshadowing like “Carrie is going to kill a lot of f****ing people” and “the town is going to be destroyed.” After all that, it just seemed kind of stale and it took away from what reaction the end of the book was supposed to elicit. I think that if we didn’t know what was going to happen at the end of the novel, we would’ve of been very surprised at Carrie’s development, which brings me to my next point

My second point is that I found that there wasn’t really any character development to Carrie. Like, I can admit she developed when she was slowly getting the hang of learning her powers, but her suddenly deciding to kill everyone kind of seemed out of the blue. She could’ve had thoughts where she wanted to hurt the people that have hurt her prior to hurting everyone.

Overall this is a good horror novel for any horror buff and I really enjoyed it.

My Rating
My Rating